/Map shows if your neighborhood might be impacted by PG&E power shutoffs

Map shows if your neighborhood might be impacted by PG&E power shutoffs


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More than 250,000 Pacific Gas & Electric customers in the Bay Area were at risk of losing power starting Wednesday, as the utility company planned to preemptively shut down power to mitigate wildfire risks.

An interactive map on PG&E’s website shows wide swaths of the Bay Area that could be affected by a PSPS, or public safety power shutoff. See the gallery at the top of this story for a selection of areas at risk.

Looking through the affected areas, you’ll notice the hilly areas of the South Bay and East Bay are especially vulnerable.

Just because an area of the map is highlighted doesn’t mean the power will definitely be shut off there. The map is also subject to change.

You can also zoom in and find your neighborhood on PG&E’s interactive map on its website. Scroll down the page and find the second map. Just a heads up: The website was loading very slowly for us on Tuesday morning.


The weather this week is expected to be dry and windy, which makes the risk of a catastrophic wildfire high, PG&E officials said. The utility company wants to shut off power so its electric equipment doesn’t start a wildfire as has happened in recent years.

MORE: ‘Inside slider’ wind event forecast to bring extreme fire danger to San Francisco Bay Area

The number of potential customers affected in each Bay Area county, according to PG&E, is:

  • 32,613 customers in Alameda County
  • 40,219 customers in Contra Costa County
  • 66,289 customers in Sonoma County
  • 32,124 customers in Napa County
  • 14,766 customers in San Mateo County
  • 38,123 customers in Santa Clara County
  • 32,862 customers in Solano County

As of Tuesday morning, Marin and San Francisco counties are not expected to be affected.

Bay City News contributed to this report. 

Alix Martichoux is an SFGate digital editor. Read her latest stories and send her news tips at alix.martichoux@sfgate.com

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